getting things done the art of stress free productivity review

getting things done the art of stress free productivity review

Sign in. Log into your account. Related Posts. Oh no! You just obliterated my GTD religion! Could not agree more — you nailed it with your summary. Allen's premise is simple: our ability to be productive is directly proportional to our ability to relax. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. It discusses principles of habit, next-action decision, and outcome focusing as well as other practices that improve performance, capacity and innovation of the reader. The Kindle edition has a file size of 2.

Aside from Kindle format, it is also available as Audiobook, in paperback, and as audio CD. Getting Things Done is for a wide range of audience, from students to executive management, from teachers and coaches, to organization leaders, from homemakers, artists, retirees, to anyone who wishes to learn a new approach in managing life and work.

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Your request to send this item has been completed. APA 6th ed. Note: Citations are based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study. Getting Things Done website. David Allen Co. The Simple Dollar. The Guardian. London: Guardian News and Media Limited.

Categories : Management books Self-help books Personal development Time management non-fiction books Penguin Books books. Hidden categories: Articles with short description Articles with a promotional tone from April All articles with a promotional tone All articles with unsourced statements Articles with unsourced statements from May There are people who explain Allen's system better than Allen. Jul 17, Josh rated it it was amazing. Before I justify the five-star rating, there are a couple of qualifications: 1.

This book is written toward a certain audience: well-to-do people, mostly business executives, mostly men, mostly older. The large majority of examples mentioned are male corporate leaders. There is the occasional nod to a housewife using the system to get her chores done I kid you not , and a single reference that I can remember to someone whose work is purely creative. I feel that if you know this coming in, it wil Before I justify the five-star rating, there are a couple of qualifications: 1.

I feel that if you know this coming in, it will be easier to peel the husk and get to the tasty nougat center. The system advocated here will not help you with amorphous creative projects. If you're a writer, Allen offers nothing in the way of how to parcel out a book into attackable chunks and bang out the pages. If you're the kind of person who has a hard time focusing on creative work because less-important undone projects are nagging at you, this is a great system.

I usually dislike business books for exactly the reasons above. But what Allen does is something more applicable to knowledge workers in general. He recognizes that the amount of potential work is infinite, and then says, "Okay, you'll never get it ALL done. Let's talk about how you can at least put everything in its place, so you can feel good about what you're NOT doing. The essence of Allen's strategy is this: Develop a method for capturing everything you have to do in your life on an ongoing basis, periodically break it all down into actionable steps, arrange those actions in order, and then go to town on them.

Let's say you realize one day that you need to get a new computer. In practice it means you should write down "get a new computer" in a central repository, and then your brain should be doing something like this: "Okay, I need a new computer.

My friend Dana has a Mac and loves to talk about it. My next action on this should be to call Dana. Last night, I strung my guitar because it finally rose up to the top my big list of things to do. Right now I'm taking the time to write a review of this book because I feel on top of all the other things in my life. I am confident that writing this review is the best thing I could be doing at this exact moment.

For the first time I can remember, the miscellaneous open loops in my life are not tugging at my attention. I've closed the ones I can close, and I'm okay with the ones I haven't closed yet. I'll get to them when it's time. In short, if you're a creative person who has any kind of outside commitments i. Dec 27, Ruben rated it really liked it Shelves: I'm really glad my wife and I read this book together. It's already been very helpful in getting us to look at the reason so many things never get done on time or sometimes not at all.

The book is well written. The writing is very clear, with lots of examples, though it's a bit dry in the middle and a little flowery on the ends. That sounds like a description of a scone or something.

We're still working on getting our system set up I mean filing cabinets for reference material so I might nee I'm really glad my wife and I read this book together. We're still working on getting our system set up I mean filing cabinets for reference material so I might need to add more to this in a month's time. I'll let you know then if we're getting more things done. As a matter of fact, that's one test to see whether things are still slipping through the cracks.

Read, go! Update: one month later, I can say that I do feel less stressed about things, and I'm getting things done like never before. Mind you, I'm not perfect, but I feel there's been a noticeable upswing in how aware I am of what needs to get done. Just having an organized filing cabinet and inbox and next actions list allows me to see at a glance the things that used to just float around my mind, fighting for attention. My wife and I look forward to our weekly review Sunday nights at , when we get to go over every project and make sure that everything's on track.

I've been implementing this system in my classroom, too, and that helps with the stacks and stacks of papers I collect as a teacher. I'd love to find some way to teach this to my high school students, who can never remember to do their homework or study for tests. Anyway, I highly recommend this book. Unless you already feel that your system is highly efficient, give it a shot. Oct 23, Douglas Wilson rated it really liked it Shelves: personal-development.

A bit too detailed for my taste, but there are some magnificent principles involved here. I learned a lot. Stearns - LibraryThing This is definitely one of the most useful and practical books I have ever read.

The entire thing fit into my brain like a melody; instantly memorable, each piece flowing into the next. I opened a spreadsheet and started cataloging every unfinished task, adding new rows underneath cells to break the Open Loops into individual Next Actions. I went into the supply closet to find something that could serve as a Dedicated Inbox for pieces of paper and other physical items that needed to be processed into tasks and actions.

I asked my boss if the office would let me buy 43 folders and a hanging file in which to store them.

If you want to become a thought leader these are must-reads. Nothing in it will rock your world. Some tips work on their own—such as the idea of processing email each day and responding to those emails first that can be responded to in two minutes or less per email, then moving on to the rest that require more time—but ths you take multiple tips and put them together, then you get exponential results. I read the previous version, which talked about Palm Pilots. Oh, and if streds really want to have fun, combine your reading of this book with The Checklist Manifesto and The Power of Habit. Josh Steimle. You can never catch up on email. Your to-do list grows instead of shrinking. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Comment Name Email Website. Now check your email to confirm your subscription. There dons an error getting things done the art of stress free productivity review your subscription. Please try again. Email Getting things done the art of stress free productivity review Subscribe. getting things done the art of stress free productivity review Getting Things Done book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. In today's world, yesterday's methods just don't work. In Ge. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity - Kindle edition by Allen, David Review. “I am a devout, card-carrying GTD true believer The entire. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity by David Allen. Note: I don't review substandard books. I make time to read a lot, but I don't have a lot of​. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress Free Productivity by David Allen (Nicole Schlinger Book Review. Nicole Schlinger. Follow. Sep 19, · 2 min read. “GTD” is now shorthand for an entire way of approaching professional and personal tasks, and has spawned an entire culture of websites, organizational tools. A Review of Getting Things Done by David Allen. I just finished Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. The book has sold. Getting Things Done (GTD) is a time management method, described in the book of the same Getting Things genericpills24h.com Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-​Free Productivity cover, first edition During a weekly review, determine the context for the tasks and put each task on its appropriate list. An example of grouping. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. 0. Reviewed by Anny Reyes, New York University. For many, the twenty-four hours the day has to​. You have to review every email and write down every appointment, because opus Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity is out of date. Optimized for stress-free productivity and ready to get things done. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. Front Cover. David Allen. Penguin, - Business & Economics - pages. Reviews. In today's. Books which simplify and systemize our entire lives, such as Covey's books, seem to suck the imagination and life right out of living. There's also the issue of choosing which actions to take in the moment, which involves evaluating your context e. Allen emphasizes there is no perfect way to track projects; one just needs to know what projects they have and how to find any associated reminders. The first edition of the novel was published in , and was written by David Allen. Details if other :. This focus forces the attention and decision-making needed to get through everything. In addition, one must write down the outcomes they wish to achieve. It has nothing to do with thinking about your goals; it leaves that up to you. In practice it means you should write down "get a new computer" in a central repository, and then your brain should be doing something like this: "Okay, I need a new computer. All the good things aside, this book felt much longer than it needed to be - at least from what I took away I think it could have been covered succinctly in five or so chapters, rather than Allen says that mastering your time enables you to live in the present moment. Once Evernote decided to charge for cross-device access, I jumped back to OneNote, which was now supported on Mac the irony is that I don't even use the same OneNote account on more than one device. Second, the "end of the tunnel" is identified. Allen admits that a lot of times what is needed are a few tricks. getting things done the art of stress free productivity review